HISTORY: LASER is an acronym that stands for Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Albert Einstein first theorized the idea of a “stimulated emissions,” the foundation for the laser, in 1917. The word LASER was first used by Gordon Gould in 1957 when he was a PhD student at Columbia University. In 1960 Theodore Mainman invented the ruby crystal laser, which is considered the first successful light laser. Gordon Gould, however, had begun working on a functioning light laser two years prior in 1958, but he did not file for a patent until 1959. His application was rejected because Mainman had already filed for a laser patent by that time. After a long patent suit battle, Gould was finally awarded the laser patent in 1977.

THEORY: When a laser beam is projected into an area, and a paranormal entity crosses the beam, it will break the beam. This will give a visual confirmation of the presence of something, even if the entity itself isn’t visible to the naked eye. Also, by using spread laser beams, it may be possible to determine the size and shape of the entity as it passes through the beam field. A personal laser pointer (dot projection) can be used to spot-check a specific location. To cover a wider area the laser beam should be spread horizontally. Also, the beam should be spread vertically to cover low passing entities. A cross-hair (“+”) spread is best.

HOW TO USE: A personal laser pointer (dot projection) can be used to spot-check a specific location. To cover a wider area for a greater period of time, the laser beam should be spread horizontally. Also, the beam should be spread vertically to cover low passing entities. A cross-hair (“+”) spread is best.

SAFETY NOTE: A class 2M laser is safe for exposure to bare skin. However, caution should be used when viewing the beam. Injuries to the eye and/or vision may occur if the beam is viewed directly into the eye. Also, any form of optical magnification and/or focusing can enhance the power of the beam and cause greater injury including loss of sight. This includes binoculars, telescopes, SLR camera lenses, eyeglasses and contact lenses.

  • The laser is best used indoors and in low light or total darkness. Ambient light will degrade the range and effectiveness of the projected beam.
  • Position the laser to project the beam across the line of travel (right angle to the line of travel) you want to observe. Common lines of travel for paranormal entities include hallway, doorway, staircase, etc. Ideally the beam should terminate along a wall or other solid structure for better viewing. Do not point the laser along the line of travel.
  • The laser should be placed on a flat and level dry surface (the laser is not water/weather proof!). The laser can also be attached to a camera tripod.
  • Place a video or DVR camera behind or next to the laser, facing the direction of the beam.
  • To observe if something breaks the beam, place the camera next to the laser such that it has a clear angled view of the beam projected on the wall. Be aware this angle, however, may not show the outline of the entity.
    To observe the outline of the entity place the camera directly behind the laser. In both cases the camera needs to have a clear view of the projected cross-hair beam in order to document anything that crosses the path.
  • Activate the laser by pressing the “power” button 4 times to set it to cross-hair “+” mode. Observe the display light on the laser to confirm the mode. Be sure the beam is level. The laser will self-level within X/- 4 degrees. If the laser is unable to self-level, the beam will flash and the red lights will display on the panel. Note that a manual “non-self-leveling” mode is available for a situation where other than a straight 90-degree horizontal and vertical angle is needed.
  • Activate the camera recorder to document anything that passes by.

RANGE: The laser has an effective range of at least 30 feet. The beam will spread (horizontal width) to 100 feet at that distance. Greater range may be possible depending on the environmental conditions. However, the laser beam may not be bright enough to fully appear on video or photographs for accurate documentation.

READINGS: When reviewing the video or analyzing photographs, watch for anything that crosses the laser beam. The general outline of the entity will show as it passes through the beam’s spread. Note the approximate height and width of the entity.

 


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